Exhibition: Exploring the Green New Deal’s relationship to society, policy, and the built environment

On Nov.17th a wide array of advocates, organizers, and elected officials gathered at the Queens Museum for “The Green New Deal: A Public Assembly” to explore the Green New Deal’s (GND) relationship to society, policy, and the built environment.

The discussions were structured around three topics and their relationship to power: Energy, Transportation, and Government. For each topic a large panel with relevant maps, graphics, and other information was used as tools to begin thinking systematically and across scales. These panels will be on view through mid January in the museum’s Werwaiss Gallery for museum visitors to engage with.

Climate change is a crisis of unevenly experienced and systemic injustices that asks hard questions of scholars, practitioners, and community members alike. The Green New Deal—most famously as drafted in US H. Res. 109 and S. Res. 59, but echoed by elected officials and activists around the world—addresses these questions head-on, linking equity, the environment, and the economy to the transformations necessitated by the climate crisis.

“The Green New Deal: A Public Assembly” focused on modeling democratic debates that seriously consider the ambitions and challenges of the GND by thinking systemically and across scales. The public event included morning workshops and an afternoon series of discussions to encourage exchange among invited guests representing a range of disciplines as well as the general public.

Located at the Queens Museum—home of the Panorama of the City of New York and in the heart of the nation’s most diverse borough—“The Green New Deal: A Public Assembly” took place within US Congressional District NY 14, jurisdiction of the GND Resolution’s sponsor Representative Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez. The event was organized by the Queens Museum, the American Institute of Architects New York (AIA New York), The Architecture Lobby, Francisco J. Casablanca (¿Quién Nos Representa?), and Gabriel Hernández Solano (GND Organizer), together with the Temple Hoyne Buell Center for the Study of American Architecture at Columbia University.

At the Buell Center, “The Green New Deal: A Public Assembly” forms part of the project “Power: Infrastructure in America,” within which the Center has organized a series of research, curricular, and programming initiatives that consider the social, technical, and political contours of the ambitious—but still largely undefined—proposal. For more information, see power.buellcenter.columbia.edu

Three purple panels display information under the headers "Energy and Power," "Government and Power," "Transportation and Power."

Panels from "The Green New Deal: A Public Assembly" in the Queens Museum's Werwaiss Gallery (CJ Wang)

A large purple panels displays maps and other information under the header "Transportation and Power."

Panels from "The Green New Deal: A Public Assembly" in the Queens Museum's Werwaiss Gallery (CJ Wang)

A large purple panels displays maps and other information under the header "Government and Power."

Panels from "The Green New Deal: A Public Assembly" in the Queens Museum's Werwaiss Gallery (CJ Wang)

A large purple panels displays maps and other information under the header "Energy and Power."

Panels from "The Green New Deal: A Public Assembly" in the Queens Museum's Werwaiss Gallery (CJ Wang)

A close-up view of maps and other Green New Deal–related data visualizations.

Panels from "The Green New Deal: A Public Assembly" in the Queens Museum's Werwaiss Gallery (CJ Wang)

A close-up view of maps and other Green New Deal–related data visualizations.

Panels from "The Green New Deal: A Public Assembly" in the Queens Museum's Werwaiss Gallery (CJ Wang)

A close-up view of maps and other Green New Deal–related data visualizations.

Panels from "The Green New Deal: A Public Assembly" in the Queens Museum's Werwaiss Gallery (CJ Wang)

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